PHILOSOPHY

Simon Drummond Wigley, Ph.D., Chair

Academic Staff
Courses

The Department of Philosophy offers a B.A. and M.A. degree in philosophy. Plans for a Ph.D. degree program are in progress.

The aim of the department is threefold: (i) by exploring influential philosophical arguments and ways of arguing, the department intends to impart upon the students the intellectual resources to discern lines of thought and courses of action that are defensible as opposed to ill-considered; (ii) the department aims to foster background capabilities---self-reliance, judging well when making decisions, creativity in problem-solving, adaptability, argumentative acumen and so forth---that complement and are essential to the good use of vocational skills; (iii) by investigating abstract problems and arguments in depth and by adopting an analytic stance the department aims to provide students with a solid platform from which to pursue graduate studies in philosophy.

The curriculum is broad based in that the students are required to complete courses in a number of academic fields other than philosophy, i.e., physics, biology, computers, mathematics, economics, languages, literature, arts and history. Because the curriculum provides each student with a substantive grounding in these fields, the student is able to constructively challenge the way they are practiced from a position of authority rather than from a position of hearsay. Besides, several of the courses (e.g. languages, statistics, computer programming, summer training) aim to develop specific skills that are essential to the workplace. In the meantime, the philosophy courses on their own provide a more than sufficient basis from which to pursue graduate work in philosophy. As a result, the critical mass of philosophical understanding is established whilst at the same time each student's future career options are not foreclosed due to unnecessary over-specialization at an early stage.

The department places a premium upon: (i) discussion-based class work, encouraging the students to be actively part of the learning experience; (ii) essay-based assessment (complemented by a drafting process and a series of essay tutorials); (iii) tutorials and ongoing feedback; (iv) trusting the students to come to terms with the original texts, rather than asking them to work from watered-down commentaries on those texts; (v) the development of each student's ability to pursue independent research (culminating in the fourth year where a thesis is completed on a chosen topic under the supervision of a faculty member).

The Philosophy Undergraduate Program, Minor Program, and Course Descriptions can be found at the following address: http://www.phil.bilkent.edu.tr.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

CURRICULUM

FIRST YEAR

Autumn Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
CS 123  Introduction to Computing and Programming  3  2  3  6
ENG 101  English and Composition I  5    3  6
GE 100  Orientation  1    1  1
MATH 105  Introduction to Calculus I  4    4  7
PHIL 101  Introduction to Logic  3    3  6
PHIL 103  Introduction to Philosophy I  3    3  6
TURK 101  Turkish I      2  2

Spring Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
ECON 103  Principles of Economics  4    3  6
ENG 102  English and Composition II  5    3  6
MATH 106  Introduction to Calculus II  4    4  7
PHIL 102  Ancient Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 104  Introduction to Philosophy II  3    3  6
TURK 102  Turkish II      2  2

SECOND YEAR

Autumn Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
ECON 221  Introduction to Probability and Statistics I  3    3  6
GE 250  Collegiate Activities Program I      -  1
HIST 200  History of Turkey  4    4  8
PHIL 201  Epistemology  3    3  6
PHIL 203  Rationalists  3    3  6
PHYS 107  Basic Physics I  3  3  4  6
  Second Foreign Language Elective      3  6

Spring Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
GE 251  Collegiate Activities Program II      1  1
PHIL 202  Ethics  3    3  6
PHIL 204  Empiricists  3    3  6
PSYC 100  Introduction to Psychology  3    3  6
PHYS 108 or MBG 110      3  6
  Second Foreign Language Elective      3  6

Students should take either PHYS 108 or MBG 110 in this semester in addition to the aforementioned courses (see ELECTIVES)

THIRD YEAR

Autumn Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 299  Summer Training I      -  6
PHIL 303  Kant  3    3  6
PHIL 305  Intermediate Logic  3    3  6
PHIL 401  Metaphysics  3    3  6
  Literature Elective      3  6
  Second Foreign Language Elective      3  6

Spring Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 301  Political Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 306  Philosophy of Language  3    3  6
PHIL 308  Philosophy of Mind  3    3  6
  Art Elective      3  6
  Second Foreign Language Elective      3  6

FOURTH YEAR

Autumn Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 304  Philosophy of Science  3    3  6
PHIL 399  Summer Training II      -  6
PHIL 403  Senior Thesis I  3    3  6
  Computing Elective      3  6
  Electives (2)      6  12

Spring Semester

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 302  Social and Legal Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 402  Aesthetics  3    3  6
PHIL 404  Senior Thesis II  3    3  6
  Elective      3  6
  History Elective      3  6

SECOND FOREIGN LANGUAGE ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
FRE 111  Basic French I  4    3  6
FRE 112  Basic French II  4    3  6
FRE 113  Basic French III  4    3  6
FRE 114  Basic French IV  4    3  6
FRE 211  Intermediate French I  4    3  6
FRE 212  Intermediate French II  4    3  6
FRE 213  Intermediate French III  4    3  6
FRE 214  Intermediate French IV  4    3  6
FRE 381  Communication Skills in French I  4    3  6
FRE 382  Communication Skills in French II  4    3  6
FRE 401  Readings in French I  4    3  6
FRE 402  Readings in French II  4    3  6
GER 111  Basic German I  4    3  6
GER 112  Basic German II  4    3  6
GER 113  Basic German III  4    3  6
GER 114  Basic German IV  4    3  6
GER 211  Intermediate German I  4    3  6
GER 212  Intermediate German II  4    3  6
GER 213  Intermediate German III  4    3  6
GER 214  Intermediate German IV  4    3  6
GER 381  Communication Skills in German I  4    3  6
GER 382  Communication Skills in German II  4    3  6
GER 421  Readings in German I  4    3  6
GER 422  Readings in German II  4    3  6
HART 231  Ancient Greek I  3    3  6
HART 232  Ancient Greek II  3    3  6
HART 239  Latin I  3    3  6
HART 240  Latin II  3    3  6
HART 333  Ancient Greek III  3    3  6
HART 334  Ancient Greek IV  3    3  6
HART 343  Latin III  3    3  6
HART 344  Latin IV  3    3  6

HISTORY ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
HART 120  Human Evolution and World Prehistory  3    3  6
HIST 411  Ottoman History: 1300-1600  3    3  6
HIST 412  Ottoman History: 1600-1914  3    3  6
HIST 413  Byzantine History I: 324-1025  3    3  6
HIST 414  Byzantine History II: 1025-1453  3    3  6
HIST 415  British History: 1485-1914  3    3  6
HIST 416  Medieval British History  3    3  6
HIST 417  Medieval Europe (500-1500)  3    3  6
HIST 418  Modern Europe (1453-1914)  3    3  6
HIST 424  America and the World since 1898  3    3  6
HIST 431  History of the United States until the Reconstruction  3    3  6
HIST 432  History of the United States from the Reconstruction  3    3  6
HIST 433  History of American Politics  3    3  6
IR 347  The International System  3    3  6
IR 351  Globalization  3    3  6
IR 464  History of the Cold War  3    3  6
IR 493  European Union  3    3  6
IR 494  Causes and Prevention of War  3    3  6
POLS 338  Cosmopolis: From the Roman to the Ottoman and British Empires  3    3  6
POLS 343  Social Theory: Past and Present  3    3  6
POLS 353  Foundations of Modern Political Theory  3    3  6
POLS 407  Contemporary Political Ideologies  3    3  6
POLS 421  Issues in Modern Political Thought  3    3  6
POLS 464  Interculturalism and Europe  3    3  6
POLS 475  European Union: The Challenges  3    3  6

LITERATURE ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
AMER 343  American Theater  3    3  6
AMER 357  American Intellectual History I  3    3  6
AMER 358  American Intellectual History II  3    3  6
AMER 374  American Poetry  3    3  6
AMER 383  American Novel to 1900  3    3  6
AMER 384  American Novel From 1900  3    3  6
AMER 448  American Pragmatism  3    3  6
AMER 460  Contemporary Native American Writers  3    3  6
AMER 483  Freedom and Philosophy in Anglo-America  3    3  6
AMER 492  Gender Studies in American Culture  3    3  6
ELIT 224  World Mythology  3    3  6
ELIT 242  Introduction to Drama  3    3  6
ELIT 262  The English Novel (19th Century)  3    3  6
ELIT 265  Introduction to the Novel  3    3  6
ELIT 270  Poetry  3    3  6
ELIT 281  The Short Story  3    3  6
ELIT 351  Shakespeare I (Comedies, Romances, Problem Plays)  3    3  7
ELIT 352  Shakespeare II (Tragedies, Roman Plays, Histories)  3    3  7
ELIT 355  Renaissance Literature  3    3  6
ELIT 356  Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literature  3    3  6
ELIT 361  Modern British Fiction I (to the 1950s)  3    3  7
ELIT 362  Modern British Fiction II (1950s to present)  3    3  6
ELIT 423  Theory and Practice of Criticism  3    3  6
ELIT 443  British Drama  3    3  6
ELIT 457  Major Writers of the Victorian Period  3    3  6
ELIT 463  Post-Colonial Literature  3    3  6
ELIT 471  Romantic Poetry  3    3  6
ELIT 474  Twentieth Century Poetry  3    3  6
HUM 331  Humanities and Social Science Honors Seminar  3    3  6
POLS 437  Politics and Literature  3    3  6

ART ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
COMD 321  Analysis of Moving Image  3    3  6
COMD 322  Film Theory and Criticism  3    3  6
COMD 354  Game Design and Research    3  3  6
FA 213  Introduction to Printmaking I    3  3  6
FA 223  Visual Perception and Color    3  3  4
FA 262  Fine Arts Seminar  3    3  4
FA 361  Philosophy of Art I  3    3  6
FA 371  History of Art III  3    3  4
FA 372  History of Art IV  3    3  4
FA 421  Analysis of Art Work I  3    3  4
FA 422  Analysis of Art Work II  3    3  4
GRA 341  History of Graphic Art  3    3  6
HART 430  Readings in Near Eastern Art and Archaeology  3    3  6
HART 440  Readings in Anatolian Art and Archaeology  3    3  6
HART 450  Readings in Greek Art and Archaeology  3    3  6
HART 460  Readings in Roman Art and Archaeology  3    3  6
HART 470  Readings in Byzantine Art and Archaeology  3    3  6

ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
AMER 207  American Texts and Contexts I  3  1  4  6
AMER 293  American History I  3    3  6
BIM 223  Business Communications  4    3  6
BIM 224  Managerial Communications  4    3  6
COMD 205  Basic Photography    3  3  6
COMD 322  Film Theory and Criticism  3    3  6
COMD 331  News Reporting and Writing  3    3  6
COMD 333  News and Society  3    3  6
COMD 341  Media and Society  3    3  6
COMD 342  Popular Culture  3    3  6
COMD 346  Introduction to Advertising  3    3  6
COMD 348  New Media  3    3  6
COMD 363  Music and Media  3    3  6
COMD 364  Video Production for Non-majors    3  3  6
COMD 424  Media Theory and Methods  3    3  6
COMD 433  Gender and Media  3    3  6
COMD 471  Media Ethics  3    3  6
ECON 203  Microeconomic Theory I  3    3  6
ECON 205  Macroeconomic Theory I  3    3  6
ECON 363  History of Economic Thought  3    3  6
ELIT 114  Critical Reading  3    3  6
ELIT 139  Appreciation of Literature  3    3  6
ELIT 217  Research and Writing Techniques for Literary Essays  3    3  6
ELIT 222  Introduction to Theory and Criticism  3    3  6
GRA 209  Graphic Design for Non-Majors    3  3  6
GRA 218  Essentials of Photography    3  3  6
GRA 323  Logos, Symbols and Signs    3  3  6
GRA 324  Photographic Practice    3  3  6
IR 101  Introduction to World Politics  3  2  3  6
IR 331  War, Peace and Security  3    3  6
IR 335  International Relations Theory  3    3  6
IR 338  Politics of International Economy  3    3  6
IR 346  Human Rights and Human Security Regimes  3    3  6
IR 352  Environmental Issues and Ecological Sustainability  3    3  6
IR 413  Game Theory and International Politics  3    3  6
IR 454  International Environmental Politics  3    3  6
IR 465  Global Economic Governance  3    3  6
LAUD 483  Environment Philosophy and Ethics  3    3  6
LAW 313  Business Law  3    3  4
MATH 300  A Concise History of Mathematics  3    3  6
MBG 110  Introduction to Modern Biology  3    3  6
MBG 416  Science and Ethics  3    3  6
MBG 488  Introduction to Human Genetics  3    3  6
PHIL 405  Advanced Philosophy of Language  3    3  6
PHIL 406  Advanced Philosophy of Mind  3    3  6
PHIL 407  Medieval Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 408  Nineteenth Century Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 409  Introduction to Phenomenology  3    3  6
PHIL 410  History of Analytic Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 411  What is a Mind?  3    3  6
PHIL 412  Philosophy of Mathematics  3    3  6
PHIL 413  Foundations of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHIL 414  Consciousness  3    3  6
PHIL 415  Moral Psychology  3    3  6
PHIL 416  From the Kitchen to the Streets: An Introduction to Feminism  3    3  6
PHIL 418  Philosophy of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHYS 108  Basic Physics II  3  3  4  6
PHYS 226  Quantum Physics  3    3  6
POLS 357  Ethics and Morality in Daily Life  3    3  6
POLS 449  Political Concepts  3    3  6
POLS 466  Issues in Political Theory  3    3  6
POLS 483  Liberalism and Socialism: Past and Present  3    3  6
POLS 484  Life, Nature and Politics  3    3  6
POLS 488  Film and Politics  3    3  6
POLS 495  International Political Economy  3    3  6
POLS 4204  Politics of The Balkans  3    3  6
POLS 4536  Turkish Politics in Comparative Perspective  3    3  6
PSYC 102  Introduction to Social Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 103  Introduction to Psychology II / Social and Developmental  3    3  6
PSYC 200  Cognitive Psychology  3    3  7
PSYC 203  Statistics I  3    3  6
PSYC 205  Statistics II  3    3  6
PSYC 220  Brain and Behaviour  3    3  6
PSYC 230  Social Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 240  Developmental Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 310  Perception, Attention, and Action  3    3  6
PSYC 320  Cognitive Neuroscience  3    3  6
PSYC 420  Selected Topics in Cognitive Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 430  Clinical Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 431  Psychological Testing and Measurement  3    3  6
PSYC 433  Abnormal Psychology  3    3  6
PSYC 434  Child and Adolescent Psychopathology  3  1  3  6
PSYC 435  Industrial and Organisational Psychology  4    3  6
PSYC 482  Mind in Evolution  3    3  6
PSYC 483  Theory of Mind  3    3  6
PSYC 491  Introduction to Cognitive Psychology  3    3  6

MBG 110 or PHYS 108 may be taken as elective, if not taken the second year.

MINOR PROGRAM

Professor Tom Nagel (New York University) regards fundamental research on nine core areas -- how we know anything; other minds; the mind-body problem; the meaning of words; free will; right and wrong; justice; death; the meaning of life -- as the essential responsibilities of a philosopher. The best way to become skilled at philosophy is to think about these topics analytically and in the tradition of rational inquiry.

Since its inception, the Department of Philosophy has hosted numerous distinguished analytic philosophers as short- or long-term visitors. The staff members, while pursuing diverse interests within the discipline, also subscribe to the analytic vision. The Minor Program in philosophy should arm a student who completes its course requirements with an indispensable background (and tricks of the trade) needed for advanced study. The courses in the Program study the original philosophical works in the foregoing areas mentioned by Nagel.

Prerequisite Courses: None

CURRICULUM

Courses

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 103  Introduction to Philosophy I  3    3  6
PHIL 104  Introduction to Philosophy II  3    3  6
PHIL 201  Epistemology  3    3  6
  Electives (3)      9  18

ELECTIVE COURSES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 102  Ancient Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 202  Ethics  3    3  6
PHIL 203  Rationalists  3    3  6
PHIL 204  Empiricists  3    3  6
PHIL 301  Political Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 302  Social and Legal Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 303  Kant  3    3  6
PHIL 304  Philosophy of Science  3    3  6
PHIL 306  Philosophy of Language  3    3  6
PHIL 308  Philosophy of Mind  3    3  6
PHIL 401  Metaphysics  3    3  6
PHIL 402  Aesthetics  3    3  6
PHIL 418  Philosophy of Cognitive Science  3    3  6

GRADUATE PROGRAM

Master of Arts in Philosophy

The M.A. degree in philosophy is designed to develop an advanced understanding of philosophical problems, especially those in contemporary analytic philosophy and the history of philosophy. It provides students with an understanding of key philosophical debates and problems, and encourages them to develop and defend their own argumentative position. Coursework will often have an interdisciplinary character. Many courses will explore the impact of empirical and theoretical developments in other disciplines on contemporary philosophical debates.

Admission: Applicants from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. Those without an undergraduate major or minor in philosophy may be required to take preparatory undergraduate courses in philosophy before they commence the M.A. degree. Applicants must demonstrate sufficient proficiency in English. (Also refer to the "Graduate Admissions" section in the introduction of this catalog for the general graduate admission requirements.)

Degree Requirements: The program requires students to complete a minimum of 24 units of course work. By the end of the second year the student will complete and defend a master's thesis in a specialized field of study.

CURRICULUM

Courses

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
GE 500  Research Methods and Academic Publication Ethics      -  1
GE 590  Academic Practices      -  12
PHIL 501  Research Preparation in Philosophy I  3    3  8
PHIL 502  Research Preparation in Philosophy II  3    3  8
PHIL 591  Thesis Seminar    1  -  4
PHIL 599  M.A.Dissertation      -  56
  Electives (2)      6  12
  Expanded Restricted Electives (2)      6  12
  Restricted Electives (2)      6  12

EXPANDED RESTRICTED ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 401  Metaphysics  3    3  6
PHIL 402  Aesthetics  3    3  6
PHIL 405  Advanced Philosophy of Language  3    3  6
PHIL 406  Advanced Philosophy of Mind  3    3  6
PHIL 407  Medieval Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 408  Nineteenth Century Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 409  Introduction to Phenomenology  3    3  6
PHIL 410  History of Analytic Philosophy  3    3  6
PHIL 411  What is a Mind?  3    3  6
PHIL 412  Philosophy of Mathematics  3    3  6
PHIL 413  Foundations of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHIL 414  Consciousness  3    3  6
PHIL 415  Moral Psychology  3    3  6
PHIL 416  From the Kitchen to the Streets: An Introduction to Feminism  3    3  6
PHIL 418  Philosophy of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHIL 501  Research Preparation in Philosophy I  3    3  8
PHIL 502  Research Preparation in Philosophy II  3    3  8
PHIL 504  Philosophy of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHIL 521  History of Political and Educational Philosophy  3    3  7
PHIL 531  Metaphysics  3    3  6
PHIL 532  Aesthetics  3    3  6

RESTRICTED ELECTIVES

Code Course Name Hours Credit ECTS
Credit
Lec. Other
PHIL 501  Research Preparation in Philosophy I  3    3  8
PHIL 502  Research Preparation in Philosophy II  3    3  8
PHIL 504  Philosophy of Cognitive Science  3    3  6
PHIL 521  History of Political and Educational Philosophy  3    3  7
PHIL 531  Metaphysics  3    3  6
PHIL 532  Aesthetics  3    3  6


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